Touch Me Nots
Alcohol (Isopropyl)

As a solvent and denaturant (a poisonous substance that changes another substance's natural qualities), alcohol is
found in hair color rinses, body rubs, hand lotions, after-shave lotions, fragrances, and many other cosmetics and
personal care products. A petroleum-derived substance, it is also used in antifreeze and as a solvent in shellac and
diluted essential oils. According to A Consumer’s Dictionary of Cosmetic Ingredients, ingestion or inhalation of the
vapor may cause headaches, flushing dizziness, mental depressions, nausea, vomiting, narcosis, anaesthesia, and
coma. The fatal ingested dose is one ounce.
This study is especially important since “the risk equation changes significantly for children”. Tests at the University of
Bologna in Italy found TEA to be the most frequent sensitizer used in cosmetics, gels, shampoos, creams, lotions, etc.

DEA, MEA, TEA

These "mouthful" chemicals (diethanolamine, monoethanolamine, and triethanolmine) are hormone-disrupting
chemicals known to form nitrates and nitrosamines, often in conjunction with other chemicals present in a product, e.
g., Cocamide DEA, or Lauramide DEA. They are almost always in products that foam; bubble bath, body wash,
shampoo, soap, facial cleanser. On the TV show "CBS This Morning", Roberta Baskin said that "It [DEA] is in
hundreds of cosmetic products,,,,,but it does something more than make soap bubbles...A Federal government study
says that DEA and DEA-based detergents have been shown to greatly increase the risk of cancer, especially liver and
kidney cancer…."7

John Bailey, head of the cosmetic division for the FDA, says that the new study is especially important since
"the risk
equation changes significantly for children." Tests at the University of Bologna in Italy found TEA to be the
most frequent sensitizer used in cosmetics, gels, shampoos, creams, lotions, etc. 12

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U. S. Food and Drug Administration
Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition
Office of Cosmetics Fact Sheet
December 9, 1999

Diethanolamine and Cosmetic Products

The National Toxicology Program (NTP) completed a study in 1998 that found an association between the topical
application of diethanolamine (DEA) and certain DEA-related ingredients and cancer in laboratory animals. For the
DEA-related ingredients, the NTP study suggests that the carcinogenic response is linked to possible residual levels
of DEA. The NTP study did not establish a link between DEA and the risk of cancer in humans.

Although DEA itself is used in very few cosmetics, DEA-related ingredients are widely used in a variety of cosmetic
products. These ingredients function as emulsifiers or foaming agents and generally are used at levels of 1 to 5% of a
product's formulation.

FDA takes the results of the NTP study very seriously and has made the assessment of public health risk one of the
highest priorities for the cosmetics program. To determine whether or not the NTP findings suggest a risk to human
health, FDA is in the process of carefully evaluating the studies and test data to determine the real risk, if any, to
consumers. This evaluation includes laboratory studies to measure the degree to which DEA penetrates human skin
and the amount of DEA found in commercial products.

The Agency believes that at the present time there is no reason for consumers to be alarmed based on the use of
these substances in cosmetics. However, consumers wishing to avoid cosmetics containing DEA or DEA-related
ingredients may do so by reviewing the ingredient statement that is required to appear on the outer container label of
cosmetics offered for retail sale to consumers.
With the exception of color additives and a few prohibited ingredients, a cosmetic manufacturer may use almost any
raw material as a cosmetic ingredient. The following are some of the most commonly used ingredients that may
contain DEA:

  • Cocamide DEA
  • Cocamide MEA
  • DEA-Cetyl Phosphate
  • DEA Oleth-3 Phosphate
  • Lauramide DEA
  • Linoleamide MEA
  • Myristamide DEA
  • Oleamide DEA
  • Stearamide MEA
  • TEA-Lauryl Sulfate
  • Triethanolamine

http://vm.cfsan.fda.gov/~dms/cos-dea.html

Urea (Imidazolidinyl) & DMDM Hydantoin

These are just two of many preservatives that release formaldehyde (called “formaldehyde donors”). According to the
Mayo Clinic, formaldehyde can irritate the respiratory system, cause skin reactions and trigger heart palpitations.
Exposure to formaldehyde may cause joint pain, allergies, depression, headaches, chest pains, ear infections, chronic
fatigue, dizziness, and loss of sleep. It can also aggravate coughs and colds, and trigger asthma. Other possible side
effects include weakening the immune system and cancer. Formaldehyde-releasing ingredients are very common in
nearly all store brands of skin, body, and hair care, antiperspirants, and nail polish. A more complete list of products
that contain formaldehyde can be found in the book by Doris J. Rapp, M.D., titled,
Is This Your Child’s World?

Special Note on Chlorine: Although chlorine isn’t in personal care products, most such products don’t protect against
chlorine’s damaging effects. Exposure to chlorine in tap water, showers, pools, laundry products, cleaning agents,
food processing, and sewage systems can contribute to asthma, hay fever, anemia, bronchitis, circulatory collapse,
confusion, delirium, diabetes, dizziness, irritation of the eyes, mouth, nose, throat, lung, skin, and stomach; and heart
disease, high blood pressure, and nausea. It is also a possible cause of cancer.4

FD&C Color Pigments       

According to
A Consumer’s Dictionary of Cosmetic Ingredients, “....many [pigments] cause skin sensitivity and
irritation....and absorption [of certain colors] can cause depletion of oxygen in the body, and death”. In
Home Safe
Home
, author Debra Lynn Dadd says that “....colors that can be used in foods, drugs, and cosmetics....are made from
coal tar. There is a great deal of controversy about their use, because animal studies have shown almost all of them to
be carcinogenic.”

Fragrance

Most deodorants, shampoos, sunscreens, skin care, body care, and baby products contain fragrance. Many of the
compounds in fragrances are carcinogenic or otherwise toxic. “Fragrance on a label can indicate the presence of up
to 4,000 separate ingredients. Most, or all, of them are synthetic. Symptoms reported to the FDA have included
headaches, dizziness, rashes, skin discoloration, violent coughing and vomiting, and allergic skin irritation. Clinical
observation by medical doctors has shown that hyperactivity, irritability, inability to cope, and other behavioral
changes.”3

Mineral Oil

Used in many personal-care products (baby oil is 100% mineral oil!), this ingredient actually coats the skin just like
plastic wrap, disrupting the skin’s natural immune barrier and inhibiting its ability to breathe and absorb the Natural
Moisture Factor (moisture and nutrition). As the body’s largest organ of elimination, it is vital that the skin be free to
release toxins. But mineral oil impedes this process, allowing toxins to accumulate, which can promote acne and other
disorders. It also slows down skin function and normal cell development, resulting in premature aging of the skin.

Parabens

A recent report is questioning the safety of the most common group of cosmetic preservatives called "parabens".
Researchers from the Department of Biology and Biochemistry of Brunel University in the United Kingdom have
conducted a study and found that the parabens – alkyl hydroxy parabens — alpha hydroxy benzoate (methyl-, ethyl-,
propyl-, and butyl-paraben) are weakly estrogenic. In other words, these preservatives have the ability to mimic
estrogen in the body with butylparaben being the most potent.

"Given their use in a wide range of commercially available topical preparations, it is suggested that the safety in use of
these chemicals should be reassessed, with particular attention being paid to estimation of the actual levels of
systemic exposure of humans exposed to these chemicals." 5

"The study of this group of chemicals in products such as skin care, makeup and deodorants has found that the
substances can have adverse effects when injected under the skin of laboratory animals. Scientists believe that the
parabens may be absorbed through pregnant women’s skin, where they then may act as an alien female hormone. A
male exposed to this hormone as a fetus may develop fertility problems as an adult.

"It is estimated that 99 percent of all cosmetic and body care products contain some form of the paraben
preservatives. If this is the case, other safe alternatives need to be developed for widespread use in the cosmetics
industry. Be a smart shopper and look for paraben-free products."6

Polyethylene Glycol (PEG)

This is used in cleansers to dissolve oil and grease as well as thicken products. A number after “PEG” refers to its
molecular weight, which influences its characteristics. Because of their effectiveness, PEGs are often used in caustic
spray-on oven cleaners, yet are also found in many personal care products. Not only are they potentially
carcinogenic, but they contribute to stripping the skin’s Natural Moisture Factor, leaving the immune system vulnerable.

Propylene Glycol (PG)    

As a “surfactant” or wetting agent and solvent, PG is actually the active component in antifreeze. There is no
difference between what is used in industry and what is used in personal care products. Industry uses it to break down
protein and cellular structure (what the skin is made of), yet it is found in most forms of make-up, hair products,
lotions, after-shave, deodorants, mouthwashes, toothpaste, and is even used in food processing. Because of PG’s
ability to quickly penetrate the skin, the EPA requires workers to wear protective gloves, clothing, and goggles when
working with this toxic substance. PG’s Material Safety Data Sheets warn against skin contact because PG has
systemic consequences, such as brain, liver, and kidney abnormalities. But there isn’t even a warning label on
products such as stick deodorants, where the concentration is greater than that of most industrial applications.

SODIUM LAURETH SULFATE
SODIUM LAURYL SULFATE

There is a lot of information – and misinformation – in the media about these surfactants. Several internet websites,
particularly those concerned with human health and environmental safety, list all of the reasons their products do not
contain
SLS or SLES. Other sites, such as "urban legends" sites, and specifically those sites that advertise products
containing
SLS or SLES, claim that all of the information showing SLS and/or SLES to be at least worth further study, if
not downright dangerous, is nothing but hype.

SLS/SLES is a detergent, wetting agent, and emulsifier. It is used in about 98% of all "personal care" products as well
as other products; hand and body creams, depilatories, bubble baths, hair color kits, shampoos, conditioners,
toothpastes, shaving cream, shower gel, facial cleansers, "baby wipes", "soapless" shampoos, and many others.

It is sometimes listed as "coconut oil" or "from coconuts" because it is originally derived from coconuts. However, pure,
unprocessed coconut oil is NOT SLS. The American College of Toxicology says that SLS stays in the body up to five
days. Other studies show it easily penetrates the skin, and enters and maintains residual levels in the heart, liver,
lungs, and even the brain. X6

Cosmetics-industry apologists often claim that the same
American College of Toxicology study also reports: "Both
Sodium and Ammonium Lauryl Sulfate appear to be safe in formulations designed for discontinuous, brief use followed
by thorough rinsing from the surface of the skin. In products intended for prolonged contact with skin, concentrations
should not exceed 1%."

Well, yes, it does say that. Please notice the words
"discontinuous, brief use followed by thorough rinsing…." – how
many of America’s children have a "discontinuous, brief" bubble bath? And "should not exceed 1%" – yet, in a number
of shampoos, SLS is the FIRST ingredient listed. It definitely comprises more than 1% in those products.

In addition, since it is in nearly every product used for personal cleaning, any one person taking a shower,
shampooing and conditioning hair, using a special cleanser for "sensitive" skin, and brushing teeth, has just absorbed
far more than the supposed "safe" amount.

Worse, now some toothpastes containing both SLS and Triclosan are claiming that their toothpastes "continue
working" or "stay on the teeth" for up to twelve hours after brushing. That is hardly a "discontinuous, brief use".

Here is a synopsis of what some reports show about Sodium Lauryl and Laureth Sulfate:

SLS penetrates eyes and tissues. Tests show that SLS can penetrate into the eyes as well as systemic tissues (brain,
heart, liver, etc.) and shows long-term retention is those tissues. There is an immediate concern relating to this eye
penetration, especially when used in soaps, shampoos, and bubble baths: Dr. Keith Green, Ph.D., D.Sc., reports
that….
"Sodium Lauryl Sulfate denatures the proteins of eye tissues, impairing development permanently.
Because it is absorbed through the skin, it does not have to enter the eye directly…."
, And "Sodium Lauryl
Sulfate impairs proper structural formation of young eyes and causes permanent eye damage. SLS causes eye
irritation, is linked to cataracts, and delays healing of corneal tissue….".x8

SLS can form nitrates and nitrosamines (potent carcinogens that cause the body to absorb nitrates at higher levels
than even nitrate-contaminated food, such as some hot dog meats or some bacon). Particularly in combination with
the DEA, TEA, and MEA (Diethanolamine, Triethanolamine, and Monoethano- lamine, themselves very questionable
ingredients)
SLS/SLES has been found capable of producing these carcinogens. The FDA is currently studying the
problem of the Di-, Mono-, and Tri- ethanolamines and is considering legal options at this time.

SLS/SLES can strip moisture and oils from the skin. It is a degreaser as well as a sudsing agent. According to the
Journal of Investigative Dermatology, and the above-mentioned J. Am. College of Toxicology report, SLS produces
skin and hair damage, including cracking and severe inflammation of the derma-epidermis tissue. The denaturation
properties can also separate and inflame skin layers.
SLS has a "degenerative effect on the cell membranes"
and SLS causes slight to moderate skin irritation in low concentrations, and skin corrosion and severe irritation in high
concentrations.x9

SLS/SLES may not "cause" cancer, but definitely can produce carcinogens in combination with other common
ingredients. That alone should be enough to initiate further studies. And the questions regarding eye damage,
particularly to babies and children, are certainly deserving of more investigation


Urea (Imidazolidinyl) & DMDM Hydantoin

These are just two of many preservatives that release formaldehyde (called “formaldehyde donors”). According to the
Mayo Clinic, formaldehyde can irritate the respiratory system, cause skin reactions and trigger heart palpitations.
Exposure to formaldehyde may cause joint pain, allergies, depression, headaches, chest pains, ear infections, chronic
fatigue, dizziness, and loss of sleep. It can also aggravate coughs and colds, and trigger asthma. Other possible side
effects include weakening the immune system and cancer. Formaldehyde-releasing ingredients are very common in
nearly all store brands of skin, body, and hair care, antiperspirants, and nail polish. A more complete list of products
that contain formaldehyde can be found in the book by Doris J. Rapp, M.D., titled, Is This Your Child’s World? 9

Special Note on Chlorine: Although chlorine isn’t in personal care products, most such products don’t protect against
chlorine’s damaging effects. Exposure to chlorine in tap water, showers, pools, laundry products, cleaning agents,
food processing, and sewage systems can contribute to asthma, hay fever, anemia, bronchitis, circulatory collapse,
confusion, delirium, diabetes, dizziness, irritation of the eyes, mouth, nose, throat, lung, skin, and stomach; and heart
disease, high blood pressure, and nausea. It is also a possible cause of cancer.4

TRICLOSAN

The latest rage in the arsenal of antibacterial chemicals, triclosan is included in detergents, dish soaps, laundry
soaps, deodorants, cosmetics, lotions, creams, and toothpastes and mouthwashes. In 1998, Americans snatched up
$540 million of these products, without proof that they even do what they claim.

But, is triclosan safe? The EPA registers it as a pesticide, giving it high scores as a risk to both human health and the
environment. The USP recently proposed a new monograph for the specific testing of triclosan. It is a chlorinated
aromatic, similar in molecular structure and chemical formula to some of the most toxic chemicals on earth: dioxins,
PCB’s, and Agent Orange. Its manufacturing process may produce dioxin, a powerful hormone-disrupting chemical
with toxic effects in the parts per trillion (one drop in 300 Olympic-sized swimming pools!). Hormone disruptors pose
enormous long-term chronic health risks, because they interfere with the way hormones perform (such as changing
genetic material, or fostering birth defects).

Triclosan is a chlorophenol, a class of chemicals suspected of causing cancer in humans. Externally, it can cause skin
irritations, but since "….phenols can temporarily deactivate the sensory nerve endings….contact with [triclosan] often
causes little or no pain". "Internally, it can lead to cold sweats, circulatory collapse, convulsions, coma, and even
death". Stored in body fat, it can accumulate to toxic levels, damaging the liver, kidneys, and lungs, and can cause
paralysis, sterility, suppression of immune function, brain hemorrhage, decreased fertility and sexual function, heart
problems, and coma."

Employing a strong antibiotic agent such as triclosan for everyday use is of questionable value, as it takes a shotgun
approach to killing all microscopic organisms while also destroying the beneficial bacteria in the environment and in
our bodies. These friendly bacteria cause no harm, and often produce beneficial effects, such as aiding metabolism
and inhibiting the invasion of the harmful pathogens.

Boston-based microbiologist Laura McMurray and colleagues at the Tufts University School of Medicine, say that
"triclosan is capable of forcing the emergency of ‘superbugs’ that it cannot kill. Experiments have shown that it may not
be the all-out germ killer that scientists once thought it was….using triclosan daily in the home, in products ranging
from children’s soaps to toothpaste to ‘germ-free’ cutting boards, may be unwise. In "New Products Feared Breeding
Tougher Germs", J.B. Verrengia says "Public health officials have blamed the indiscriminate prescription of antibiotics
for the spread of drug-resistant bacteria. The Tufts study suggests the recent widespread use of antibacterial agents
in everyday products might have similar results". Doctors say that washing your hands with soap and water is the best
preventative, and some doctors admit that including triclosan in the soap is an additional, unjustified expense; plain
soap does just as well.

FOR MORE INFORMATION REGARDING CHEMICALS IN COSMETICS OR THE C.A.R.E.S. FOUNDATION, SEE
http:
//www.lindachae.com
For information on chemical free products:
D’s Abundant Life – Danielle Koprowski
(630) 965-1747
nredjuice@sbcglobal.net